3 Common Car Cd Player Problems…and What To Do About It

While CDs are more durable than the records and cassettes they replaced, CD players are still prone to a variety of malfunctions. The following is a list of the most common problems you're likely to encounter.

Problem #1 - Adhesive Labels

Adhesive labels are big with creative types who don't like the Black Sharpie solution to labeling CD-Rs. But usage may impede proper disc balance, spin (especially the half-disc labels) and interfere with the laser's ability to read data. Worse still, the label can come off the disc and jam the internal mechanisms.

Solution: For the love of Pete, stop using adhesive labels! End the cycle of abuse; do not accept mix CDs from friends who use these labels and embrace the Sharpie, it's your friend.

Problem #2 - Kids

Every parent has experienced the awesome joy of starting the car after their child has been playing in the front seat. Your senses are bombarded by the windshield wipers, climate control fan, and car radio all going full blast. Some tykes go the extra mile and also feed loose change into the CD player slot. The coins can physically damage sensitive components or act as a conductor for electricity and short out circuits on the board.

Solution: Get an EZ Pass system and stop leaving change for the tolls in the cup holder. Because (let's be honest) despite your best efforts, your kids aren't going anywhere.

Problem #3 - Wear and Tear

If the problem with your CD player isn't #1 or #2, than the most likely suspects are worn gears or a busted transport mechanism. Any machine with moving parts (especially small moving parts) is going to wear out and break down eventually. On the upside, you don't have to yell at your friends or kids for breaking your car stereo.

Solution: Remove the unit and have it repaired by knowledgeable, car radio repair experts. A rebuild will ensure many more years of use and enjoyment.

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